Music

Join-the-dots

Psych album of the week: The Cure’s Join the Dots (2004)

Psychedelia is a key ingredient in their sound and a B-sides collection of “alternate” tracks is the perfect place to find some of the Cure’s trippiest stuff

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Dopesmoker

Psych album of the week: Sleep’s Dopesmoker (1995)

Time becomes relative and you surrender to the experience, track markers and breaks in the music be damned

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Schmidt

Psych album of the week: Sinoia Caves’ The Enchanter Persuaded (2006)

In his own project, Black Mountain’s Jeremy Schmidt has free rein to craft his own brand of mostly instrumental synth-based soundscapes

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funkadelic-maggot

Psych album of the week: Funkadelic’s Maggot Brain (1971)

The album’s trippy production touches include heavily treated percussion, extended Hendrix-style, fuzz drenched, wah-guitar solos, and strange atonal vocalizations

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brmc

Psych album of the week: Black Rebel Motorcycle Club’s B.R.M.C. (2001)

The band creates memorable tunes that swagger and will themselves into existence despite changing musical trends—pretty much what rock ‘n’ roll is all about

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cream-1967

Psych album of the week: Cream’s Disraeli Gears (1967)

Not only is it one of the finest records released in that bumper crop year, it is surely one of the best classic rock records of all time

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aphex-twin-drukqs

Psych album of the week: Aphex Twin’s Drukqs (2001)

No other Aphex Twin album has collected such a nuanced and balanced picture of everything that Richard D. James does so well

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Father-John-Misty

Remembering that time Father John Misty told me about his psychedelic experiences

Father John Misty doesn’t make psychedelic music per se. What it may lack in acid-rock trappings, it makes up for with insights the artist attributes to his drug trips

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barrett

Psych album of the week: Syd Barrett’s The Madcap Laughs (1970)

As a pop album, it’s a disaster. As a document of Syd Barrett’s splintering psyche, on the other hand, it’s fascinating

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