Weed could be the next great spicy food remedy 

Cannabis may be useful in reversing the sting of capsaicin, the ingredient in peppers that makes them spicy

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You’re at the chili cookout, and you’ve got a problem: nothing seems to be bringing the heat.

Your neighbour Ned’s five-alarm chili is only two alarm, two-and-a-half, tops! He sobs as you down his weak chili. You’re a king, a man amongst boys. Until you stumble by the police chief’s stand, and taste The Merciless Pepper of Quetzalacatenango, grown deep in the jungle by the inmates of a Guatemalan asylum. Even though you planned for this by covering your tongue in candle wax, this pepper whips ass. What do you do? 

Reach for a joint, apparently.

A long-forgotten report from the University of California San Diego suggests that cannabis may be useful in reversing the sting of capsaicin, the ingredient in peppers that makes them spicy.

According to the study, there’s “a significant correlation between plasma levels of  THC, the active ingredient in cannabis, and decreased pain.”

There have also been anecdotal reports of cannabis and capsaicin interacting among those with cannabis hyperemesis syndrome, or CHS, a condition that causes nausea and pain after smoking weed. Hot sauce is often recommended as a treatment. 

Read on for yourself, or try it next time you go a little overboard on the Guatemalan Insanity Peppers.