British authorities threaten to crack down on unregulated CBD products

CBD products that are not registered before March 2021 risk being “taken off the shelves”

R+R Medicinals / Unsplash

0

CBD products that haven’t been registered with regulators in the United Kingdom risk being pulled from shelves, BBC News reports.

The country’s Food Standards Agency (FSA) say producers have been slow to register products since British authorities began regulating the market for cannabidiol (CBD) in January 2019.

No products being sold in the UK have been approved. Companies have until March 31, 2021 to do the paperwork.

“The CBD industry must provide more information about the safety and contents of these products to the regulator by March 2021, or the products will be taken off the shelves,” FSA chief executive Emily Miles said.

Sales of CBD products have skyrocketed in the UK, but trials have found “potentially hazardous” ingredients or illegal amounts of THC, the psychoactive substance in marijuana. Other reports state that tests have found no CBD or unlisted amounts of CBD in products. Oils, tinctures and edibles are among the items for sale.

Although products such as CBD oil do not contain psychoactive properties, authorities warn against using it alongside prescription medication and other drugs. The regulations recommend consumers take no more than 70 mg per day and people who are pregnant or breastfeeding have been warned against taking CBD.

Products have been on sale for years but the FSA has been slow to regulate the market. Although companies haven’t rushed to register their products, industry figures believe the regulatory regime will build consumer confidence.

“We believe that this will elicit the safety studies that are vital to build consumer confidence and help develop a socially responsible and sustainable industry,” the Association for the Cannabinoid Industry’s Steve Moore told the BBC.

The FSA regulates food products throughout the UK except Scotland.